HOMEWORK PLANS for September 1-9

 

 

 

Welcome to Middlesex Middle School!

Thursday- *All supplies due on Friday, September 9th. label everything!

* 2 4×6 photos of you (and only you) is due on Tuesday.

*Give your parents/guardians their homework

assignment. Enjoy the look on their faces……J

OPTIONAL HOMEWORK: Print out a picture of your pet or favorite animal for our bulletin board.

*Check out the Middlesex Homework Page.

 

Friday –   Two of the Most Beautiful Words___________________

*All supplies due on Friday, September 9th.

*2 4×6 photo of you (and only you) is due on Tuesday.

*Begin to collect items for your P.B.P. Remember to take

a picture of anything valuable. Due September 12th.

*Check out the Middlesex Homework Page

OPTIONAL HOMEWORK: Print out a picture of your pet or favorite animal for our bulletin board

 

Tuesday    Think about your two most beautiful words and let me know tomorrow!

*All supplies due on Friday.  Bring to class!

*Begin to collect items for your P.B.P. Remember to take

a picture of anything valuable. Due September 12th.

OPTIONAL HOMEWORK: Print out a picture of your pet or favorite animal for our bulletin board

*Check out the Middlesex Homework Page

Complete “I am a person who……”

 

Wednesday- **All supplies due Friday. This is your first grade!

*Have you collected items for your P.B.P? Due on Monday!

OPTIONAL HOMEWORK: Print out a picture of your pet or favorite animal for our bulletin board

 

Thursday- All supplies due tomorrow. You may NOT go to your locker if you forget any supply, so plan ahead. This is a graded assignment.

Friday- **Paper Bag Project due on Monday. Make sure you label the paper bag with your name AND class period. Practice what you will say with someone this weekend

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. cause:  an event or action that causes something else to happen. “Because” is a clue word that helps identify the cause.  It answers the question “Why?”.

 

  1.  effect:  an event or action that happened as a result of another event or action. It answers the question “What happened?”.

 

  1. speculation (to speculate):  making a judgmental statement based on other facts

 

  1.  fact:  statement that can be proven to be true

 

  1. connotation: the emotional, psychological, or social associations of a word; connotation goes beyond the “literal” meaning of the word

 

  1. denotation:  the literal (actual meaning) of a word

 

  1. infer (inference) something has happened; you do not see, hear, feel, smell, or taste the actual event. However, from what you know, it makes sense that it has happened

 

  1. implicit:  capable of being understood from something else; not stated outright

 

  1. central idea:  unifying element of the story, which ties together all of the other elements of fiction and non-fiction used by the author to tell the story

 

  1.  theme:  the message or lesson that an author is conveying through the story.  It is not implicit or literal (not obvious)

 

  1. compare:  to look at (two or more things) closely in order to see what is similar or different about them or in order to decide which one is better

 

  1. contrast:  to compare (two people or things) to show how they are different

 

  1. point of view:  the vantage point from which the story is told

 

  1. author’s purpose (author’s approach): the reason the author wrote a story.  An author’s purpose may be to entertain, inform, teach, or convince

 

  1. form: the type of literature, such as short story, novel, poem, or drama.

 

  1.  structure:  the design the author uses to tell his or her ideas.  (Acts are part of the structure of a drama, paragraphs are part of the structure of fiction, and lines and stanzas are part of the structure of a poem.)

 

  1. summarize (summary):  to give a brief account of the main ideas or events and the most important details

 

  1. best:  better than all others in quality or value; most appropriate

 

  1. analogy: a comparison that explains one word or idea by comparing it to something else that the readers may know more about

 

  1. evidence:  includes facts, details, and examples that support your ideas

 

  1. mood:  atmosphere or climate of feeling in a literary work

 

  1. tone:  author’s attitude, stated or implied, toward a subject; the overall effect of the writing in a story; for example, a comedy has a funny tone; a tragedy has a sad tone; a mystery has a suspenseful tone

 

  1. directions: a statement that tells a person what to do and how to do it. Prior to beginning ANY task, it is IMPERATIVE (super important!) to read all the directions. (If one fails to read the directions, one will most likely fail the task!)

 

Thursday-  SBAC practice begins tomorrow.

Friday-   Get a good night sleep on Sunday night.  Make sure you eat a good breakfast every morning next week!

Bring in a baby picture by next Tuesday.  Do NOT share it with anyone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Writers often tell you more than they say directly in text. They give you hints or clues that help you “read between and beyond the lines.” Using these clues to get a deeper meaning of the text is call INFERRING. If you INFER that something has happened, you do not see, hear, feel, smell or taste the actual event. However, from what you know, it makes sense that it has happened. You make inferences everyday. Most of the time you do so without even thinking about it.

 

  1.  Antagonist– usually the villain of a story – the person who creates the conflict of the main character.
  2.  Author’s Purpose – the reason the author wrote a story. An author’s purpose may be to entertain, inform, teach, or convince.
  3. Claim – a well-developed, well-organized, arguable statement; the main argument of an essay.
  4. Explicit – very clear and complete, leaving no doubt about the meaning, obvious
  5. Implicit – capable of being understood from something else; not stated outright
  6.  Mood – atmosphere, climate of feeling in a literary work
  7. Motive – the reason behind a character’s action
  8. Parable – a very short story that illustrates a truth or teaches a moral lesson
  9.  Protagonist – the hero of a story who is faced with a conflict.  The protagonist is usually the main character.
  10.  Thememessage; life lesson of a story; underlying meaning of a story
  11.  Toneauthor’s attitude, stated or implied, toward a subject; the overall effect of the writing in a story; for example, a comedy has a funny tone; a tragedy has a sad tone; a mystery has a suspenseful tone
  12. Infer– to arrive at a conclusion by examining the evidence; to read between the lines.
  13. MLA citation= Modern Language Association citation; to give credit with parenthesis ( Author’s name, page number)

For example: (Bunting 9). Please note: the period goes AFTER the parenthesis.

 

 

 

 

symbolism- when an author places a symbol in his/her piece of work in order to make the reader think abstractly.

 

concrete noun– a noun that taps into the 5 senses.  You can physically hear, taste, touch, smell, or see it.

abstract noun– a noun that does NOT tap into all of the 5 senses.  You can’t physically see it. It names an idea, a thought, a feeling or a concept.

 

The five senses– touch, taste, smell, hear, sight

 

Make sure you can define and give examples for the terms above

 

Any time you read any figurative language term, show it to me for a special chance to win at the end of the marking period. J You must be able to show it to me.

Spelling words:  Quiz on Tuesday, September 22nd.

believe

Mrs. Boldrighini

Mrs. Kelly

Mrs. Schneidermeyer

Dr. Boccanfuso

friend

beginning

definitely

misspell

because

Tuesday- Practice spelling words. Quiz next Tuesday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday- Study for your quiz:  It will be all matching, no spelling !

  1. cause: an event or action that causes something else to happen. “Because” is a clue word that helps identify the cause. It answers the question “Why?”.

 

  1. effect: an event or action that happened as a result of another event or action. It answers the question “What happened?”.

 

  1. speculation (to speculate): making a judgmental statement based on other facts

 

  1. fact: statement that can be proven to be true

 

  1. connotation: the emotional, psychological, or social associations of a word; connotation goes beyond the “literal” meaning of the word

 

  1. denotation: the literal (actual meaning) of a word

 

  1. infer (inference) something has happened; you do not see, hear, feel, smell, or taste the actual event. However, from what you know, it makes sense that it has happened

 

  1. implicit: capable of being understood from something else; not stated outright

 

  1. central idea: unifying element of the story, which ties together all of the other elements of fiction and non-fiction used by the author to tell the story

 

  1. theme: the message or lesson that an author is conveying through the story. It is not implicit or literal (not obvious)

 

  1. compare: to look at (two or more things) closely in order to see what is similar or different about them or in order to decide which one is better

 

  1. contrast: to compare (two people or things) to show how they are different

 

 

  1. point of view: the vantage point from which the story is told

 

  1. author’s purpose (author’s approach): the reason the author wrote a story. An author’s purpose may be to entertain, inform, teach, or convince

 

  1. form: the type of literature, such as short story, novel, poem, or drama.

 

  1. structure: the design the author uses to tell his or her ideas. (Acts are part of the structure of a drama, paragraphs are part of the structure of fiction, and lines and stanzas are part of the structure of a poem.)

 

  1. summarize (summary): to give a brief account of the main ideas or events and the most important details

 

  1. best: better than all others in quality or value; most appropriate

 

  1. analogy: a comparison that explains one word or idea by comparing it to something else that the readers may know more about

 

  1. evidence: includes facts, details, and examples that support your ideas

 

  1. mood: atmosphere or climate of feeling in a literary work

 

  1. tone: author’s attitude, stated or implied, toward a subject; the overall effect of the writing in a story; for example, a comedy has a funny tone; a tragedy has a sad tone; a mystery has a suspenseful tone

 

.

Spelling:

interview

activism

petition

journalism

courage

submission

credentials

query

inspiration

citation

plagiarism

SPELLING:

  1. opportunity
  2. appropriate
  3. recommend
  4. especially
  5. separate
  6. meant
  7. familiar
  8. equally
  9. comparable
  10. addition
  11. AAAWWUBBIS- what each letter stands for- spelling counts!

 

 

 

 

 

_________________________________________

Term Meaning Example
alliteration repetition of the initial consonant sounds terrible truthslullaby lies
assonance repetition of vowel sound mystery disguised within
consonance repetition of consonant sounds, but not vowel sounds gloomy woman
hyperbole An outrageous exaggeration used for effect. He weighs a ton!
imagery Language that evokes sensory image. drip of ruby teardrops (aural/sound)to wake up where the green grass grows (visual/sight)lips like cool sweet tea (oral/taste)streaming through a velvet sky (tactile/touch)the stench of the underworld (olfactory/smell)
internal rhyme rhyming that occurs within the line (rather than at the end) piece of me emerges
metaphor comparison of unlike things(made without using like or as) I am the lone wolf.
onomatopoeia a word that imitates the sound it represents Crash, went the waves!
oxymoron A combination of two words that appear to contradict each other. Bittersweet; jumbo shrimp; a pointless point of view
personification Attributing human characteristics to an inanimate object, animal, or abstract idea. The days crept by slowly, sorrowfully.
rhyme a pattern of words that contains similar soundsat the end of the line life for meis wild and free
rhyme scheme a repeated pattern of rhymed wordsat the end of the line shifty eyes (A)desperate cries (A)rich blood, (B)bittersweet (C)she loves (D)and dies (A)
simile a comparison using like or as notes dance across the page like stars twinkle in the night sky
stanza A division of a poem created by arranging the lines into a unit, often repeated in the same pattern of meter and rhyme throughout the poem; a unit of poetic lines (a “paragraph” within the poem). The stanzas within a poem are separated by blank lines.
symbol An object or action that means more than its literal meaning. A dove is a symbol for peace. A four leaf clover is a symbol for luck.

 

Literary Analysis Vocabulary

  1.  Antagonist– usually the villain of a story – the person who creates the conflict of the main character.
  2.  Author’s Purpose – the reason the author wrote a story. An author’s purpose may be to entertain, inform, teach, or convince.
  3. Claim – is the main argument of an essay
  4. Explicit – very clear and complete, leaving no doubt about the meaning, obvious
  5. Implicit – capable of being understood from something else; not stated outright
  6.  Mood – atmosphere, climate of feeling in a literary work
  7. Motive – the reason behind a character’s action
  8. Parable – a very short story that illustrates a truth or teaches a moral lesson
  9.  Protagonist – the hero of a story who is faced with a conflict.  The protagonist is usually the main character.

10.  Theme – message; life lesson of a story; underlying meaning of a story

11. Tone – author’s attitude, stated or implied, toward a subject; the overall effect of the writing in a story; for example, a comedy has a funny tone; a tragedy has a sad tone; a mystery has a suspenseful tone

Spelling demons: You must know how to spell these words:

neighbor, beautiful, principal, principle, English, writing, sentence, Wednesday, tomorrow, finally, succeed, Dr. Boccanfuso, Mrs. Boldrighini, Mrs. Kelly,friend, beginning, definitely, misspell, believe, receive, September

Vocabulary terms: You must know the spelling, definition, and examples of each term.

 

adjective, noun, common noun, proper noun, concrete noun, abstract noun, adverb, symbol, symbolism, name the 5 senses, AAAWWUBBIS

 

VOCABULARY/WRITING TERMS FOR THIS WEEK:

symbol – a concrete noun that stands for an abstract noun.   Usually has an emotional connection.

 

symbolism- when an author places a symbol in his/her piece of work in order to make the reader think abstractly.

 

concrete noun– a noun that taps into the 5 senses.  You can physically hear, taste, touch, smell, or see it.

abstract noun– a noun that does NOT tap into all of the 5 senses.  You can’t physically see it. It names an idea, a thought, a feeling or a concept.

 

The five senses– touch, taste, smell, hear, sight

common noun- a generic noun that is NOT capitalized.

proper noun- a noun that names a specific person, place, thing/object and IS capitalized.

Make sure you can define and give examples for the terms above

 

 

 

 

Week 3=noun, adjective, adverb, synonym, antonym, neighbor

Week 2= beautiful, principal, principle, English, writing, sentence, Wednesday, tomorrow, finally, succeed

 

Week 1=Dr. Boccanfuso, Mrs. Boldrighini, Mrs. Kelly,

friend, beginning, definitely, misspell,

believe, receive, September

11 thoughts on “HOMEWORK PLANS for September 1-9

  1. Scotty I thought that it was great that those people were kind enough to help the trapped bears escape from the dumpster. Not only was the video nice to watch because of the kind people, it was also humorous to see the little babies climbing out of a dumpster and onto the ground.

  2. At first, I felt confused watching the video. Then, when the baby bears climbed out, I enjoyed watching the bears reunited as a family. The babies were adorable climbing out of the garbage bin. It was really nice to watch the people helping animals.
    I bet that mother bear is pretty happy and thankful!
    Alex Mostofi

  3. hi mrs kelly since i missed your class today whick i really wish i didnt im a little confused on the HW and my printer isnt working so could i send my stanzas to u and then you can print them out for me? thx miss Kelly bye

  4. HI Mrs Kelly! Unfortunately during this weekend while playing hockey I suffered from a minor concussion. I spoke with my doctor and he is recommending that if I go to school there should be no homework. Is there anyway that I could take the test a little later in the week if I’m feeling well enough. I’m juts worried I’m going to push my brain to far. Thanks,
    Patrick Yowan
    Period 4

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